Skip to content Skip to footer

MYTHS: HOWDY DOODY FS II.263 – Andy Warhol

After President Nixon’s 1972 visit to China, and the inevitable buzz it created in the press, Andy Warhol was inspired to create a series of prints that would immortalize the image of the Chinese leader, Mao Zedong. Warhol could see a blurry mirror image of US media to Chinese propaganda.There were parallels between the cult like following of movie stars in the West and Mao Zedong in the East. Seeing these in a strange likeness, Warhol produced his Mao series in a fashion reminiscent of his portraits of American celebrities like Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley. These color charged screen prints of Mao were further set apart by the layers of graffiti-like scribbles that were screened on separately, transforming Mao into a world wide pop icon. Hand signed in felt pen. Edition of approximately 100. Artwork is in excellent condition. Additional images are available upon request. Certificate of Authenticity is included. Please do not hesitate to ask us any further questions.

Medium: Screenprint on wallpaper

Dimensions: 40 x 29.5 inches

Year: 1974

Edition: Of 100

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist

Description

Andy Warhol, a leading figure in Pop Art, created vibrant works reflecting the consumer-driven culture of the mid-20th century. Known for iconic images like Campbell’s Soup cans and Marilyn Monroe portraits, Warhol used mass-production techniques, challenging traditional art boundaries. His work blurs the line between high art and popular culture, impacting contemporary art and shaping discussions on celebrity and consumerism.

Refund Policy

All sales are final, The Art Plug does not offer any money-back guarantees. You recognize and agree that you shall not be entitled to a refund for any purchase under any circumstances.